In what state are most American Werewolf Sightings?

If, as many humans think, werewolves are just myth, legend, and folklore, well then it would stand to reason that werewolves are spotted equally throughout the entire United States.  People would report sightings all throughout the nation pretty much equally – right?

Well, not exactly! The number of werewolf sightings in the United States are actually a bit higher in one state in particularWisconsin. In fact, Wisconsin boasts well over 200 werewolf sightings! Sightings date back as far as 1936 when a hairy 6 foot creature with a wolf-like face and an odor of “decaying meat” was spotted digging in an old Indian Burial ground near Jefferson, Wisconsin.  Since then, Wisconsin has continuously ranked highest in first hand werewolf reports and encounters.  Wisconsin accounts for some of the country’s more famous sightings such as the infamous “Beast of Bray Road” which dates back to 1949 as well as the more current sightings of the “Beast of 7 Chutes” (aka the Dogman).  While many recent sightings clearly describe werewolves, others seem to be linked more closely with a resemblance to a bigfoot-type creature.

 

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11 Responses

  1. JakeGhostLord says:

    😀

  2. Sheila says:

    O…M…G my bestie lives in Wisconsin! :(

  3. Gabriel says:

    @Sheila: Thought you said beastie lol. And I’m not sure sightings really have to do with a specific area, I mean if you’ve noticed a few sightings happen in an area and suddenly a ton start happening? I mean yes an increase in activity would increase sightninfs naturally but I believe it’s just people flocking to the area to become famous off of some awesome claim or blurred image. It’s like a witch hunt, on person gets suspicious and suddenly everyone is and then I think 24 people die. This rule actually applies to all theories: crop circles, vampire sightings, hauntings, etc. sorry to go into such detail but not many people are on and I’m bored.

  4. Hmmmm I would of never figured Wisconsin for being the #1 state for werewolf sightings. I wonder why?

  5. Titan says:

    @Sheila: Cool ur grills they ain’t gonna eat her if they even are #1 filled with werewolves. hmmmm.

  6. ThatStranger says:

    Well that messes with me since my dads side is from Wisconsin, and I have no idea who my grandpa on that side of the family is. xD

  7. Madd Dogg says:

    makes sense there’s a shit load of cattle

  8. Wolfie says:

    that is true and i WAS having high hopes to move there cause of all the land and i might get a bead on a wolf sneaking up on cattle to defend when they’re gone get raw meat and toss it into the forest done and done both races are happy

  9. Lycanhope says:

    @Wolfie: Providing wild animals with food encourages them to return. On a more serious note, it causes a loss in fear of humans over time, to the point where they may start hunting in populated areas. This increases the chance of hostile encounters between starving wolves and humans on their own.
    So, yes, “happy”

  10. Wolfie says:

    err…then that will suck cause i dont wanna die

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