Silver to kill a werewolf

Readers,

Do you need silver to kill a werewolf?

I know many of you may agree with Buddy on this but you know I try to explain anyway.

You do not need silver to kill a werewolf.

You COULD kill a werewolf with silver if somehow you could get him to drink it or get a large amount of it into his bloodstream but you do not NEED the silver to kill the werewolf (drinking large amounts of silver is deadly and toxic, do not drink silver, ever!). The bullet alone would kill him and the silver would just be unnecessary. The problem you would have with killing a werewolf is getting the bullet to pierce his thick bone structure. The bone structure is so thick around the werewolf’s torso or chest area that even a bullet would be difficult to get passed this layer. The werewolf is built on a strong bone structure therefore it would be difficult to achieve killing him at all (in werewolf form). Think of a werewolf as wearing a bullet proof vest around his chest area made out of his own bone built upon his transformation. When he is in his transformed state he would be very difficult to kill with a bullet, and imagine trying to get close to him to try to kill him in another manner, it would be deadly!

At any rate, silver is unnecessary to kill a werewolf.

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Werewolf967

I am the second contributor to the ilovewerewolves home. Buddy is the first.

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110 Responses

  1. Madd Dogg says:

    @Mvbaerqvoir: Look If you are a troll give up now because you have already been out trolled on this site by well…me and dude you just gave away your cover so 🙁 on you

  2. Soul Tepes says:

    I wonder if this Rhiver person knows that “loup-garou” isn’t the propper way to spell it as well as it is not a term used from italy but from Romania….Sorry if it is off subject but. But like all was said and done, he was a troll and the term he used, he got from the movie Blood and Chocolate.

  3. cyrix says:

    the following 2 paragraphs are my experience with silver… if you don’t want to read them, then just sip over them

    there once was a time that I put a silver dollar on my arm just to see what would happen… ill advised… first it started to burn, then I got the rash and blisters, after that It started itching like nobody’s business.

    a different time I was treating an open wound on my leg with a pre-medicated bandage… little did I know that it contained silver iodine… in short I got necrosis, and had to cut out all of the dead tissue, scrub it all out and start treating it all over again. it finally healed, but it was very slow.

    now… maybe you have already discussed an allergic reaction to silver in a previous comment… I don’t know… I didn’t read all of the comments this time… but in my opinion there really is no better teacher than experience.

    anyway there is my 2 cents worth… and trust me when I say I try to keep these things as short as I can… this is the edited version… there was actually more to it, but what was left out is not relevant.

  4. Lee Ann says:

    >Be me a trained medical professional
    >Read a comment where someone tries to sound like they have the tiniest bit of knowledge about human anatomy.
    >Forever laughing.

  5. Lycanhope says:

    Because that’s how allergic reactions work.

  6. cyrix says:

    now what? am I going to have to start posting pictures of open wounds?

    so be it… this is the wound I was treating. I ran into the back of a short black tilt trailer at night, and I did some damage to my right leg. the picture was taken May 31, 2012 shortly after it stopped bleeding.

    https://plus.google.com/photos/100829345827895912773/albums/6000194416359730065/6000194417322457426?pid=6000194417322457426&oid=100829345827895912773

  7. Lycanhope says:

    And, funnily enough, still not an allergic reaction. What you have there is an infection, not necrosis. And most likely not remotely caused by the silver iodide, as it’s a very common ingredient in antiseptics, which is kind of the opposite of a bacterial infection.
    That’s my opinion as a chemist, but I’m sure Lee Ann can confirm it as a medical professional.

    What that picture is is of you hurting your leg with a trailer, woot, dreadfully exciting.

  8. Lee Ann says:

    Looks like a textbook w ound of someone who fell off a skateboard. Seeing as there’s barely any infe ction or dis colouration. That really didn’t prove anythimg seeing you’re claiming to have n ecrosis which means your skin wound literally be turning orange, yellow and b lack. Not to mention p atches would be starting to raise and peel off. And that n ecrosis stems from ce lls undergoing apo ptosis. So simply “cu tting out” the d ead skin and scrubbing the w ound wouldn’t do much as I’m assuming the dis ease was in your bloo d stream based on the w ounds nature. Oh and plus you have little sc rapes and ab rasions all down your leg past the actual main w ound. Which is pretty typical of a sc r ap ing or falli ng w ound. Maybe wear kneepads when you go biking next time. (I have no idea which words triggering this to be modded so Im putting spaces on a bunch of them lol)

       

  9. Lee Ann says:

    Ugh my comment says nothing offensive yet keeps getting modded…

  10. nightwolf says:

    lee ann: your in the medical field?….cool im going to be as well too…but more military type deal…im going to be a combat medic for a little bit then switch to the guys who defuse b*mbs…anyways use symblos for big words and miss spell a few words…that gets rid of moderation

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